Posts Categorized: Cut-out-and-keep

Parker Morris dead






An inspector dealing with an appeal against the refusal of planning permission for a one-bedroom dwelling in Cornwall (DCS Number 400-015-804) has announced the demise of the Parker Morris standards.

The inspector noted that the building would have an internal floorspace of approximately 33.5 square metres. He recorded that this would be short of the minimum recommended level of 37 square metres for a dwelling of this type set out in the Government’s nationally described space standards published on 27 March 2015.

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Just kidding around






Between ourselves, part of the fun of this job is in reading about the inventive and sometimes hilarious schemes people dream up to circumvent planning legislation. Here’s one you’ll like.

This case (DCS Number 400-015-641) involves an appeal against an enforcement notice requiring the removal of a goat shelter built on skids from agricultural land in Devon. The appellant contended that the shelter was a mobile field shelter that contravened no planning legislation. The planning authority, on the other hand, considered that the timber building constituted a building operation and was development within the meaning of s55 of the Act, and referred to the tests to establish whether a structure is a building on the basis of its size, permanence and attachment to the land (Barvis Ltd v SSE [1971] and Skerritts of Nottingham Ltd v SSETR [2000]).

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Never heard of it






In referring to Dunnett Investments Ltd v SSCLG and East Dorset District Council [2016] an inspector dealing with an appeal against the refusal of a certificate of lawfulness to confirm the unfettered A1 retail use of a unit on a retail park in Newcastle has helpfully set out the judge’s summary of the law on conditions. Take a peek here (DCS Number 400-015-376).

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Lights, camera, action!






Though it might appear that it’s all glamour in town planning those of us in the business understand that there is a lot of technical know-how involved behind the scenes. An appeal case concerning the refusal of a certificate of lawfulness for the use of a property in south London for a mixed use as a dwelling and a photoshoot and film location (DCS Number 400-015-391) illustrates the point. In this case the inspector considered whether the use had achieved immunity from enforcement action.

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