Posts Categorized: Cut-out-and-keep

Fine words






As planners we strive for clarity and precision when writing committee reports and site appraisals, so it’s useful to keep a mental folder of relevant vocabulary. You might like to file the following from a recent appeal decision (DCS Number 400-017-750).

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A matter of substance






Councils tend to be a bit cautious in dealing with amendments to planning applications, not unreasonably in our view as it is so easy to be caught out. That said, the planning system ought to be able to accommodate refinements to development proposals without all parties involved having to start again at square one. A recent appeal decision (DCS Number 200-007-183) indicates that amendments ought to be refused consideration as such only if they are substantially different from the original proposal.

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No room at the inn






As we remember the story of an infant child in need of shelter we might take a charitable view of an inspector’s decision to grant temporary permission for four unauthorised Traveller pitches in the green belt in Yorkshire, after he gave weight to the needs of the children on the site (DCS Number 200-007-139).

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Spaced out






Further confirmation that ‘isolated’ in Paragraph 55 of the NPPF means physically isolated comes in the shape of a recent appeal relating to the refusal of outline permission for redevelopment of commercial buildings and a bungalow in the Worcestershire countryside with five dwellings (DCS Number 400-017-468). In this case the inspector usefully quotes the words of the judge in Braintree District Council v Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Greyread Limited & Granville Developments Limited [2017]:

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Third time unlucky






Show this one to your stubborn client who refuses to heed your expert advice not to appeal.

An inspector dealing with the proposed residential conversion of a derelict building in north Yorkshire has awarded costs against the appellants, finding that they had acted unreasonably in appealing (DCS Number 400-016-970).

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It might come in






This one will appeal to hoarders.

In dealing with an application for a certificate of lawfulness to confirm that a permitted development extension to a cottage in Yorkshire had been lawfully implemented and could therefore be completed (DCS Number 400-016-702), an inspector explained that in such cases the relevant GPDO is that in force at the time the development was begun. In the case before her the inspector noted that a trench and foundation were dug and installed, respectively, when the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995 was in force.

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A classic case






The issue of the planning unit comes up not infrequently, particularly in enforcement cases. As an inspector has recorded and helpfully set out in his decision (DCS Number 400-016-723), the classic definition is found in Burdle v Secretary of State for the Environment [1972]. Readers might find it useful to keep this somewhere handy.

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