Shakespeare 400

As we all know, 2016 marks the 400-year anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare. Ever topical, the DCP Blog is delighted to be able to report an appeal decision in which The Bard gets a mention (DCS Number 400-011-383). This case concerns the residential conversion and extension of a listed timber-framed barn in Stratford-upon-Avon. The property was originally a house, reputed to have been owned by Richard Shakespeare, and possibly the birthplace of William Shakespeare’s father and uncle. The appeal proposal involved adding a large, two-storey extension that would increase the volume of the barn by over 80 per cent. The inspector judged that an extension of such a size would be out of keeping with the existing size and scale of the listed barn and dominate its appearance to an unreasonable extent. He considered that the barn was a significant local heritage asset not only because of its considerable age and traditional appearance but also as a result of its possible historical associations with William Shakespeare’s family. The public benefits of the scheme, which included the repair of the deteriorating barn, were outweighed by the harm, he concluded.

Assuming there is a degree of substance to the reputed association with the Shakespeare family, this really isn’t the year to be contemplating a bit of an extension to the birthplace of Shakespeare’s dad.

The following DCP chapter is relevant: 27.3

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